Safer Solutions Total Environment Centre
Safer Solutions
. .
Home arrow In Your Home arrow Managing Pests Safely arrow Flea products for pets
.
Flea products for pets PDF Print E-mail
A number of commonly used pesticides in flea treatments are currently under review by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA).

Please check the APVMA website for details on the review of the following pesticides before use: fipronil, carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, dichlorvos, maldison (malathion), fenthion. www.apvma.gov.au/chemrev/chemrev.shtml

Always follow label instructions and use an appropriate product for the age and size of your pet and your situation. Donít use out of date products as they can be dangerous. If you or your pet experiences any adverse reactions to a flea product, ensure you or your vet immediately reports the problem to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) see www.apvma.gov.au/qa/aerp.shtml

Insecticidal washes, shampoos, sprays, lotions, creams, dusts and soaps

A range of pesticides is registered for use in products applied to the fur of the animal including organophosphates , carbamates , synthetic pyrethroids and insect growth regulators. 

The downside to products applied to the fur is that the animal can ingest residues through grooming and you can also be exposed to them as you apply it and later when you touch the fur, children are at particular risk. 

Some products contain hazardous solvents like methylene chloride and toluene. Read product claims carefully as rarely do they give total control. Insecticidal products and rinse water should not be allowed to enter the sewerage system as they can be toxic to the aquatic environment.

Flea collars

A range of pesticides is registered for use in collars including organophosphates , carbamates , synthetic pyrethroids and insect growth regulators. Touching the collar can also expose you to pesticides and children are at particular risk. Check statements about water resistance if your pet likes to get wet. 

Concentrated spot-ons

Always consult your vet about concentrated spot-on treatments. Fipronil, a pesticide commonly used for spot-on treatments, is currently under review by the APVMA because of potentially serious side effects on the animal see www.apvma.gov.au/chemrev/chemrev.shtml .

 
< Prev   Next >
For Healthy Children

Find out why your children need to be especially protected from common chemicals found in and around the home.

Read more

Renovations Guide
Easy Guide
Detox Your Home