Safer Solutions Safer Solutions Education
Safer Solutions
. .
Home arrow Education Resources arrow Module 3: Safer Pest Control
.
Module 3: Safer Pest Control PDF Print E-mail

People are concerned that without pesticides their homes will become ‘infested with pests’

Application - This module is designed to raise learners' awareness about the risks associated with using pesticides to manage common pests around the home and safer alternatives.

Learning Outcomes

After this session, learners should be able to:

  1. Understand the concept of integrated pest management (IPM) and how it can be implemented in homes, child care centres and schools 
  2. Understand ways of mitigating risk when choosing a pest control strategy
  3. Demonstrate and explain common IPM strategies for household pests including cockroaches, ants, spiders, lice, fleas and flies

Introduction/Background

Chemical education programs conducted in the US have found indoor pest control to be the most challenging issue when educating people about reducing and eliminating their reliance on hazardous chemicals. People are concerned that without pesticides their home would become ‘infested with pests’.

This section will provide participants with an understanding of the common pests around the home and the risks associated with using pesticides to manage them. It will also suggest methods for effective and safer solutions through the development of integrated pest management (IPM) strategies in the home.

Integrated pest management (IPM) has been described as being similar to looking after your health by maintaining a healthy diet and lifestyle to ward off illness. IPM addresses the underlying causes of pest problems and puts in place low risk strategies to effectively manage them. An IPM strategy uses a number of techniques to deal with pest concerns including physical removal and barriers, cultural changes, biological baits and least hazardous chemical controls.

IPM should not be regarded as a magic bullet but rather is about developing a system that reduces and eliminates reliance on pesticides.

Learning outcome 3.1

Understand the concept of integrated pest management (IPM) and how it can be implemented in homes, child care centres and schools

Did you know?

IPM is simple and proven to work, as the case studies below show.

  • North Ryde Primary School has been implementing IPM strategies since 1998. No direct pesticide treatments have been required and the school estimated it has saved $1,800.
  • NSW Health & Safety in Children’s Centres: Model Policies and Practices in section 13.5 encourages pest control methods that are least toxic and if pesticides are used have the lowest toxicity.
  • The US Army has implemented pest control plans based on the principles of IPM in all of its child care centres since 2002. The US Army states the plans have been developed to ensure pest control does not cause harm to any personnel or the environment
  • Californian schools have developed and implemented IPM strategies successfully since 2002

Activities

Activity 3.1: Discuss with the group their main concerns with pests in the home. What are their current pest control methods, how do they use them. Record these on butcher's paper and ask the group to select the top four pests that they would like to discuss at the end of this session.

Part 3: Resources and handouts 

3.1: Provide each participant with a copy of Safer Solutions: Integrated Pest Management for Schools and Childcare Centres (2003) by Jo Immig

Learning Outcome 3.2

Understand ways of mitigating risk when choosing a pest control strategy

Introduction/Background

An IPM strategy uses a range of tools and techniques to effectively manage pest problems. Tools include physical removal and barriers, cleaning and storage methods, biological baits and least hazardous chemical controls.

Activities

Activity 3.2 a): IPM Risk Ladder. Display the ladder to the attendees and discuss how moving up the ladder increases the potential risk of exposure to hazardous chemicals. At the foundation of the ladder will be the physical, cultural and mechanical strategies. The upper levels will be the use of biological, least hazardous and hazardous chemical strategies.

Activity 3.2 b): Use break out groups to discuss the case scenarios recorded in Activity 3.1 a).

Resources

Resource 3.2 a): A4 laminated picture of ladder. Representative laminated pictures of IPM strategies such as polyfiller and flyscreen (physical), cloth and bicarbonate of soda (cultural), flyswat (mechanical), sticky traps (biological), pyrethrum (least hazardous), chlorpyrifos (most hazardous).

Handout 3.2: Safer Solutions: getting to know your pest control company

Part 3: Resources and handouts

3.2 a): Copy of Section 13.5 of NSW the Health and Safety in Family Day Care: Model Policies and Practices.
3.2 b): Safer Solutions: Integrated Pest Management for Schools and Child Care Centres. Jo Immig (2002). Total Environment Centre

Learning outcome 3.3

Demonstrate and explain common sense IPM strategies for household pests including cockroaches, ants, spiders, lice, fleas and flies.

IPM approaches to common pests in households can be found in Safer Solutions: Integrated Pest Management for schools and childcare centres from pages 30-48.

Find out more

Switching to common-sense pest management

Activities

Activity 3.3: Ask the group for three personal scenarios that they want to discuss about pest control in their homes. With the information provided within the Safer Solutions book and website work through the possible IPM solutions

Part 3: Resources and handouts

3.3: Parent’s guide to the ‘nitty-gritty’ about head lice: The University of Georgia, Cooperative Extension Service

 
< Prev   Next >
Workshop Resources

Workshop checklist
A3 Home Floor Plan
Domestos Ad
Louie the Fly & Friends
Mr Clean picture
Chlorpyrifos label
Domestos and Homebrand Caustic Oven Cleaner
A3 poster, Know where it Goes
IPM Risk Ladder
A4 picture of ladder

...more resources  

TEC